Gelato, Pasta and Shopping in Rome

On our Saturday in Rome, we returned from Vatican City and decided to skip lunch — and replace it with gelato, of course.

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We went to Giolitti, which was about 5 minutes from out hotel through a piazza. It was an adventure reaching it since the arrow just points straight across the piazza. We ended up wandering through side streets to find it and browsed a few shops, like cartoleria pantheon, which had leather goods and stationary.

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I got three flavors of gelato in the medium size: peach, pear and amoretto. The cone was kind of cheapy (not dense like I prefer) so I ate the chocolate part and abandoned the rest. The gelato itself was VERY creamy. I can see why this ancient shop is so popular. The bartender pretended to drop the cone when handing it to me — Romans are such pranksters.

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We walked by the Spanish Steps (Piazza di Spagna), finally. It was under construction though so it wasn’t very impressive. A man tried to give us “free” roses, which we denied, then he gave them to us, and then demanded money. We gave them back. Why do all the famous spots in Rome have these swindlers? It was a disappointing visit without flowers to see or the steps to sit on.

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I bought a pastry at a candy shop back by Giolitti, because we returned later to browse more shops, deciding to wait until Florence to buy leather.

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For dinner, we went to Trattoria Tritone — it was recommended by our hotel. I got cannelloni (that’s all it said on the menu). The pasta came with some sort of loose sausage filling that seemed undercooked (but made it taste more flavorful so no complaints). It was a cute restaurant with outside reserved seating, so we sat inside which looked like an old wine cellar.

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For dessert, we had tiramisu. You know it’s real when the waiter literally scoops it from a huge glass pan, and scoops extra sauce and cream. It was dappled with cocoa power and chocolate sauce – so liquidly and served unlike any other (apparently fake, no-Italian tiramisu).

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